Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2018

College/Unit

School of Medicine

Department/Program/Center

Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery

Abstract

Objective. To demonstrate lateral pharyngeal wall collapse and increased apnea-hypopnea index in a child posttonsillectomy. Background. Some children have worsening of their sleep symptoms after tonsillectomy for obstructive sleep apnea. This case report demonstrates an open airway on drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) in a child with tonsillar hypertrophy followed by more pronounced airway obstruction related to lateral pharyngeal wall collapse after tonsillectomy. Case Presentation. A 7-year- old boy presented with obstructive sleep apnea and underwent workup with DISE. Following adenotonsillectomy and subsequent lingual tonsillectomy with epiglottopexy, the patient’s sleep apnea symptoms and polysomnogram results worsened. Subsequent DISE showed a more narrowed oropharyngeal airway space as compared to his preoperative DISE. Discussion. Palatine tonsillar tissue may splint open the airway and prevent airway obstruction in a subset of pediatric patients. Further clinical studies are necessary to determine which children experience this phenomenon. Clinical examination using DISE can be useful in making clinical decisions prior to tonsillectomy.

Source Citation

Zalzal, H. G., & Coutras, S. (2018). Palatine Tonsil Stenting of the Airway as Determined by Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy. Case Reports in Otolaryngology, 2018, 1–3. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/2614143

Comments

Copyright © 2018 Habib G. Zalzal and Steven Coutras. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Share

COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.