Title

Comparative study of clinical outcome of endovascular aortic aneurysms repair in large diameter aortic necks (>31 mm) versus smaller necks

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-1-2018

Abstract

Background This study compares short-term (30 days) and intermediate term (3 years) clinical outcomes in patients with large (≥31 mm) versus small aortic neck diameters (≤28 and ≤31 mm). Methods Prospectively collected data from 741 patients who underwent endovascular aortic aneurysm repair were analyzed. Some surgeons have reported the threshold for a large aortic neck for endovascular aortic aneurysm repair to be 28 mm, whereas for others it is 31 mm. Therefore, we classified aortic neck diameter into less than or equal to 28 versus greater than 28 mm; and less than or equal to 31 versus greater than 31 mm. Logistic regression and Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to compare outcomes. Results There were 688 patients who had a defined aortic neck diameter: 592 with less than or equal to 28 mm, 96 with greater than 28 mm, 655 with less than or equal to 31 mm, and 33 with greater than 31 mm. The mean follow-up was 25.2 months for less than or equal to 31 mm versus 31.8 months for greater than 31 mm. Clinical characteristics were similar in all groups, except that there were more patients outside the instructions for use in the greater than 31 mm versus less than or equal to 31 mm group (94% vs 44%; P < .0001). There was a significant increase in early type I endoleak for patients with an aortic neck diameter of greater than 31 versus less than or equal to 31 mm (9 [27%] vs 74 [11%]; P = .01); late type I endoleaks (4 [14%] vs 18 [3%]; P = .01); sac expansion (5 [17%] vs 28 [5%]; P = .01); late intervention (5 [17%] vs 23 [4%]; P = .01); and death (9 [31%] vs 48 [8%]; P < .0001). There were no differences in outcomes between the patients with greater than 28 mm aortic neck diameters and the less than or equal to 28 mm diameters. Freedom from late type I endoleak at 1, 2, and 3 years were 96%, 88%, and 88% for patients with a neck diameter of greater than 31 mm versus 97%, 97%, and 97% for a diameter less than or equal to 31 mm (P = .19). The rate of freedom from sac expansion for patients with a diameter greater than 31 mm was 88%, 81%, and 81% at 1, 2, and 3 years versus 99%, 97%, and 92% for a diameter less than or equal to 31 mm (P = .02). Freedom from late intervention for 1, 2, and 3 years for patients with a diameter greater than 31 mm were 91%, 91%, and 91% versus 99%, 97%, and 96% for those with a diameter less than or equal to 31 mm. Survival rates at 1, 2, and 3 years for a diameter greater than 31 mm were 83%, 74%, and 68% versus 96%, 92%, and 90% for a diameter less than or equal to 31 mm (P < .001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that patients with a diameter greater than 31 mm had an odds ratio of 6.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-16.8) for mortality, 4.7 (95% CI, 1.4-15.5) for sac expansion, and 4.9 (95% CI, 1.4-17.4) for late type I endoleak. Conclusions Patients with large aortic neck diameters (>31 mm) had higher rates of early and late type I endoleak, sac expansion, late intervention, and mortality

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